Stock Plugins & Snowflakes: The Secret to Making Something Out Of Nothing

Stock Plugins & Snowflakes- The Secret to Making Something Out Of Nothing

Snowflakes are pretty cool. Especially close up.

The coolest thing is that every one is unique. Just like a song.

But without certain photography tools, we would never be able to really appreciate the nuances and beauty of these flakes.

In the same way, we can’t always appreciate a great song without a great recording to showcase it. But you’ll be surprised what we can learn from a Russian photographer who took some pretty amazing pictures with a pretty crazy setup.

Snowflake

Click here to see more pictures…and to see how they were taken!

Believe it or not, a $50 lens on a cheap camera took these pictures.

So what does that tell us about recording music? A lot, actually.

It tells us that the gear we’re using is not the most important factor in the end result. Rather, it is our skills, expertise, and knowledge of the gear we are using. Kljatov, the photographer who took these amazing pics, obviously knows a thing or two about photography.

So here’s the secret to making something out of nothing: know what you’re working with.

Doesn’t sound so great, right? But if you think about it, the best engineers and producers can use only stock plug-ins from Pro Tools and still create something amazing. That’s because they know what each piece of gear can do.

In order to get to this level, the steps are pretty simple. Pick a plug-in, virtual instrument, or even piece of hardware. But instead of just going with the preset, turn the knobs. Learn exactly what each parameter does by itself, and even what it does in conjunction with the other knobs, buttons, or faders.

Then, crack open the manual or hop online to learn exactly what is happening. Learn what Reverb damping does, how to choose a sine wave for a synth, or what the “analog” knob does.

Once you really learn a piece of gear, you’ll be ready to use it to create some amazing recordings, just like Kljatov did with his camera.